Lundy's Lane Cemetery

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Location and Size

History

The original cemetery was founded by the "Red Meeting House" Methodist church in 1817. The Methodist cemetery was also known as Garner Cemetery and Green’s Corners Cemetery. The cemetery was abandoned for several years when the Methodist Church congregation moved up the Lane. The Township of Stamford took ownership of the cemetery in 1934 and enlarged the lands by several acres. There is a distinct difference between the "old" historical cemetery and what is now known as Lundy’s Lane Cemetery.

First Known Burial

Joseph Corwin, 1820 (church elder)

Interesting Features

Red Meeting House

Red Meeting House

One of the earliest Methodist churches in the Niagara area, the Red Meeting House was constructed in 1817, at the corner of Lundy’s Lane and Montrose Rd. In 1869 it was sold and moved to Walter Ker’s property,on Drummond Road. A school was erected on that same location in 1916 which later became the Stamford Township Police Headquarters. From 1965 until 2005 the building was named the Recreation Commission Building and housed staff from the City’s Recreation & Culture Department.

Stone Cairn

Stone Cairn

In 1936 the Lundy’s Lane Historical Society erected a stone cairn in memory of the "Pioneers and the Red Meeting House 1817 - 1869". The memorial is located just inside the fenced area off of Lundy’s Lane, in the old Methodist cemetery.

Charles Green Memorial

Charles Green Memorial

A small memorial is dedicated to Charles Green, "One of the Kings Rangers, UEL". The stone is located on the outside of the fence facing Lundy’s Lane, just east of the Stone Cairn. In the 1980's a road survey crew was drawing up plans for the widening of Lundy’s Lane when they came across the grave. In light of the grave’s location, the road was narrowed by two feet so that the grave could remain untouched. Charles Green died in 1827 at the age of 87.

Holocaust Memorial

Holocaust Memorial

A memorial was erected in September 1998 and dedicated to the "memory of the six million Jewish men, women, and children who perished at the hands of the Nazis during the Nazi regime, 1933 to 1945. "Our hope for the future lies in remembering the past."

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